Fair Work Convention

Fair Work Convention Scotland, Effective Voice

Effective Voice

Effective voice is much more than just having a channel of communication available within organisations - though this is important.

Effective voice requires a safe environment where dialogue and challenge are dealt with constructively and where employee views are sought out, listened to and can make a difference.

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Fair Work Convention Scotland, Opportunity

Opportunity

It is a reasonable aspiration to want work that is fair - and for fair work to be available to everyone. Fair opportunity allows people to access and progress in work and employment and is a crucial dimension of fair work

Meeting legal obligations in terms of ensuring equal access to work and equal opportunities in work sets a minimum floor for fair work.

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Fair Work Convention Scotland, Security

Security

Security of employment, work and income are important foundations of a successful life.

Predictability of working time is often a component of secure working arrangements.

While no one has complete security and stability of employment, income and work, security is an important aspect of fair work.

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Fair Work Convention Scotland, Fulfilment

Fulfilment

For many people, work is a fulfilling part of their life. For others, work tasks, working conditions and the work environment make work unfulfilling.

Access to work that is as fulfilling as it is capable of being is an important aspiration of the Fair Work agenda. People have different views of what type of work is fulfilling for them.

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Fair Work Convention Scotland, Respect

Respect

Fair work is work in which people are respected and treated respectfully, whatever their role and status.

Respect involves recognising others as dignified human beings and recognising their standing and personal worth.

At its most basic, respect involves ensuring the health, safety and well-being of others.

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Fair Work Framework 2016

The Fair Work Dimensions - Security

Security of employment, work and income are important foundations of a successful life. Predictability of working time is often a component of secure working arrangements. While no one has complete security and stability of employment, income and work, security remains an important aspect of fair work. Context and competitive conditions impact significantly on prospects for security, but fair work is not work where the burden of insecurity and risk rests primarily on workers.

Security as a dimension of fair work can be supported in a variety of ways: by building stability into contractual arrangements; by having collective arrangements for pay and conditions; paying at least the Living Wage (as established by the Living Wage Foundation); giving opportunities for hours of work that can align with family life and caring commitments; employment security agreements; fair opportunities for pay progression; sick pay and pension arrangements. In the context of increasing global competition, pursuing higher value business models instead of competing solely on cost can help employers to provide security in work and employment.

What people told us

Of all of the issues raised by individuals and organisations who communicated with the Fair Work Convention, decent pay and secure employment were considered the most important and were the most frequently cited. This mirrors recent research carried out by the Scottish Parliament6 and Oxfam7 among others. Certain groups in Scotland - women, young people, Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) workers and disabled workers - are worse off than others when it comes to pay and employment security. Concerns were also raised about how insecure forms of employment interacted with the welfare system in undermining income security. Transparency in approaches to pay and in addressing pay disparities were also advocated. There was an appetite for the abolition of recently introduced employment tribunal fees which disadvantage the low paid in particular in accessing justice and redress through this traditional route.

We were informed of the challenges facing employers in some sectors in addressing fair pay when resources are scarce and where markets or commissioning arrangements are beyond employer influence or control. Yet we also heard examples of the benefits for employers as well as workers of eliminating low pay.

How to improve security at work
  • Ensure and support widespread awareness and understanding of employment rights.
  • Contractual stability should be a core employer objective. Forms of flexible working where the burden of risk falls disproportionately on workers (including most zero hours contracts) are not fair work.
  • All workers should be paid at least the Living Wage as calculated by the Living Wage Foundation.
  • Agreement making between employers and workers, including collective bargaining in unionised establishments and sectors, promotes stability and perceptions of security and should be supported.
  • Pay transparency and defensibility should be a core organisational objective.

SECURITY OF EMPLOYMENT, WORK AND INCOME ARE IMPORTANT FOUNDATIONS OF A SUCCESSFUL LIFE.

 

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